Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine | Pregnancy

Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine for Pregnancy
  • Morning sickness
  • Prevention and management of pre-eclampsia
  • Pubic symphysis, Hip or lower back pain
  • General aches and pains
  • Sciatica
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation
  • Sinus congestion
  • Fluid retention
  • Anxiety
  • Headaches or migraines
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Breech position
  • Birth Preparation
  • Induction
  • Some cases of threatened miscarriage
  • Prevention and management of gestational diabetes

The First Trimester – morning sickness, fatigue, anxiety  
We recommend weekly acupuncture treatments

(0 – 12 weeks) During the first trimester we recommend weekly acupuncture treatments for the mother. These treatments reduce the risk of miscarriage and ease morning sickness and fatigue by supporting the digestive system and promoting blood flow to the uterus.

 

Whether you are suffering from mildly persistent nausea or intense vomiting or both acupuncture can assist in making the day more manageable. Depending on the person it can completely resolve the symptoms of morning sickness or reduce them enough to turn a bed ridden day into one more manageable. Fatigue and food selection can be a real struggle and anxiety levels can be high and difficult to manage, regular acupuncture and a sympathetic ear can help get you through these challenging weeks.

 

The Second Trimester – support and prevention 
We recommend fortnightly – monthly  acupuncture treatments. 

(13 – 28 weeks) During this time, when the pregnancy is stronger and generally more stable, treatments are done only once per fortnight to once per month. Here we focus on reducing the risk of gestational diabetes and high blood pressure as well as addressing aliments such as placenta previa, pubic symphisis pains and any lingering morning sickness.

 

While this trimester is often said to be the “glowing trimester” it can be very difficult for those who have previously suffered late miscarriages or other complications. Acupuncture is excellent for helping to manage the anxiety of a looming anniversary while physically supporting the  current pregnancy .

 

The Third Trimester – birth preparation, breech presentation, induction. 
We recommend weekly acupuncture from 34-36weeks

(28 – 40 weeks) Fortnightly to monthly treatments are still recommended up until week 34-36 where weekly treatments are resumed to prepare your body for birth. Week 34 is the optimum time to address breech presentation babies. For more information on Acupuncture leading up to birth see our Pre-birth Acupuncture page 

 

There are acupoints that are are historically considered not to be safe to use during pregnancy and all the practitioners at Balanced Life Health Care Ferntree Gully are well aware of their locations, actions and reasons for being contraindicated. Our treatments are safe, gentle and effective with the well being of our patients at the foremost of our minds.

 

Post birth and beyond – Breastfeeding, Mastitis and Post-Natal Depression 

We recommend checking in with us after birth to help ensure a healthy transition to motherhood. Treatment options include Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal medicine 

(After birth till baby age 2 years) Regular Acupuncture during this time can help treat and prevent the following conditions;

  • Lack of milk
  • Mastitis
  • Night sweats
  • Postpartum pain
  • Fatigue
  • Depression

For more information about Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal medicine after giving birth see our Post-natal page here

Post-natal Acupuncture

References

  1. Effects of Acupuncture on pregnancy rates in women undergoing in vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis; Zheng CH et al.; Fertiity & Sterility; 2012 Vol. 97, Issue 3, 599-611
  2.  A pilot study evaluating the combination of acupuncture with sildenafil on endometrial thickness; Yu W et. Al; Presented at the Pacific Coast Reproductive Society Annual Conference 2000Reduction of blood flow impedance in the uterus arteries of infertile women with electro-acupuncture; Stener-Victorian E, et al.; Human Reproduction 1996: 11:1314-1317